make it. work.

We believe there are four important aspects of training in the development of a competitive fencer:

 group classes, private lessons, open fencing, and competitions.

 
 
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Group Classes

     Group classes are a great way to learn a variety of general skills in an interactive group setting.  Class sizes typically range from 10-15 students per instructor, and will help you learn new skills as well as review and practice your current knowledge base with only very broad instruction.  Because there is only one instructor per class, you'll rely mainly on your own observations to learn the taught skill, with limited individual-specific instruction or correction by the instructor.


Private Lessons

    The private lesson is vital to the growth and development of a fencer.  Current fencers will work one-on-one with a coach to hone your existing skill set, while brand new fencers may opt to learn the sport via private lessons as opposed to group classes.  The coach will create a brief lesson to help improve your understanding and execution of these skills with an emphasis on proper technique and decision making.

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Open Fencing

     Our open fencing sessions are the perfect opportunity to take the skills you've learned in your group classes and/or private lessons and apply them in a fun and unstructured setting.  Open fencing sessions are a great time to socialize, challenge each other, and get a great workout at your own pace.  You can come and fence a few bouts or stick around for hours of fencing.


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Competitions

     Competing is the final aspect of training required for the proper development of a fencer.  This is the opportunity where fencers get to test their skills against fencers with a variety of styles and learn to execute skills under the pressures of competition.  Although the ultimate goal for most athletes is to have good results in competition, it also is a way to meet other fencers, have fun, and learn more about yourself as an athlete.  No matter what the level of fencer you are, participating in competitions will allow you to see what skills you need to improve upon, and help you set future goals.